Another Tower in Avon

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NEWS ARTICLE from THE MORNING JOURNAL, 3-16-00, By SARAH FENSKE, Morning Journal Writer

"Radio station eyes tower site

AVON -- Hoping to expand its broadcast area, Lorain radio station WAKS/104.9 FM wants to build a 350-foot tower on Avon's northern border.

While taller than allowed by Avon's codes, the station's owner indicated a willingness to be rejected by the Planning Commission and then file for an exception with the city's appeals board [Board of Zoning Appeals].

Jim Ary, representing Clear Channel Communications, said WAKS is upgrading from 3 to 6 kilowatts. While the radio station will retain its Lorain headquarters, the Avon tower will allow more access to the Cleveland market.

'We'll be placing the tower in a better place from a competitive standpoint,' he said.

The company has signed a lease with Brett Linden, who owns property at 1100 Nagel Road in Avon's industrial corridor, Ary said.

Russ McLaughlin, an attorney for Clear Channel, promised a project with low impact to the surrounding area.

'This won't look like a cellular phone tower, which are massive,' he said. 'This will be relatively thin.'

The tower would be located near Avon's border with Avon Lake.

'This would probably be more visible to them than to our residents,' Planning Commission Chairman Jim Piazza said.

The company also has extended an offer to several local fire departments to use the tower for their signals, if permitted, McLaughlin said ..."

NEWS ARTICLE from the AKRON BEACON JOURNAL, 2-27-00, BY SALLIE COOK

"Cellular towers face limits

CHIPPEWA TWP: Since Chippewa officials can't stop cellular towers from being built in the township, they're setting some guidelines on how the towers are constructed.

Township trustees have drawn up an amendment to the zoning code to deal with the towers, which transmit data for computers and cellular phones.

The amendment requires buffer plantings and a security fence around towers and the dismantling of a tower if it is not used for six months. A conditional use permit would have to be approved by the Chippewa Board of Zoning Appeals. Residential and agricultural areas would be allowed to have antennas, not to exceed 20 feet, on buildings or existing towers. The amendment encourages the use of several antennas on an existing tower or building ...

``We can't stop cell towers,'' said John Johanyak, Chippewa's zoning inspector. ``We are trying to let adjoining neighbors voice their opinions.''

Last March [1999], the Ohio Supreme Court ruled that cellular towers were a public utility and could be constructed in commercial and industrial areas, without being subject to zoning regulations in most cases. The ruling was based on a case in Stark County's Plain Township.

Chippewa Township has four towers, including two microwave towers that were built 10 to 12 years ago, Johanyak said. Sprint has applied to build a tower west of state Route 21 and south of Clinton Street, and the township has several high spots where companies would like to build more towers ...

But Chippewa Trustee Bertha Jones said she believes the towers will be short-lived because newer technology will make them obsolete.

Don Castella, the zoning inspector for Congress Township, agrees.

``Within four to five years,'' he said, ``we will go to satellites and the towers will come down.'' ..."

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